Texercise Select
Facilitator Training

Texercise Select

An Evidence-Based Health Behavior Change Program

Facilitator Training

Texas Health and Human Services

Rev. 2/13/18

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Navigating this Training

Tips for Taking WBTs

To maximize the benefit you receive from participating in this web-based training (WBT), please consider each of the following tips:

Welcome!

This training was developed to provide people with the understanding and skills necessary to be a Texercise Select facilitator. The training details key aspects of evidence-based programs that are critical to the success of Select programs. The Select Facilitator Manual is highlighted throughout the training, providing you with a sneak peak at this comprehensive resource.

At the end of this training you will be provided with instructions to obtain and take a Select Facilitator test. Upon passing the test, you will receive the  Select Facilitator Manual. To ensure the integrity and fidelity of Select, this manual should not be shared with others unless they have also taken the training and passed testing.  

Best of luck!

Why Exercise?

In 1900 most Americans didn't live past 50, but thanks to medical advances and successful public health strategies we are now living much longer (average U.S. life expectancy is 78.) Many diseases that once claimed lives (tuberculosis, diarrhea, enteritis, etc.) are no longer the leading causes of death for adults.

That does not mean U.S. adults no longer face some critical health challenges. Being obese and overweight (directly linked to inactive lifestyles and poor diet) increases a person's risk of developing a chronic disease, and contributes to morbidity/mortality. In one study of middle-aged adults, the risk of premature death increased 20-40% for those who were overweight and two to three times for obese individuals.

Benefits of Exercise

The good news - regular physical activity is associated with improved health and longevity. A healthy diet and regular physical activity can reduce the risk of becoming overweight/obese, developing a chronic disease, falling, depression, dementia, and related disabilities.

Texercise participants have:

Module 1

TEXERCISE OVERVIEW

In this module, we will cover the following topics:

 

Select "next" when you are ready to begin.

1.1: What is Texercise

Texercise is a statewide health promotions initiative of the Texas Health and Human Services (HHS) that encourages individuals and communities to adopt healthy lifestyles - like engaging in regular physical activities and good nutrition.

Created in 1998, Texercise has been providing quality resources that engage participants and communicate the importance of healthy lifestyles and motivate participation. The Texercise initiative offers an array of resources, tools, incentives and programs to encourage healthy activities. Two program resources include:

The programs and resources available through Texercise are free of charge to participants 45 and older and community host sites.

1.2: Key Components of Select

Engagement. Twice a week for 10-weeks (the duration of the class) participants gather to learn about physical activity and proper nutrition. These classes offer engagement opportunities for the participants and provide the foundation for developing social support groups.

Trained facilitator(s). Two trained facilitators for each site are ideal. However, if that cannot be achieved due to personnel, budget, or time constraints, sites may choose to have one trained facilitator and one untrained 'volunteer'. Sites must have one facilitator who has completed this training to offer the Select program.

Self-efficacy. The activities chosen as a part of the Select program are based on the concept of self-efficacy. This concept can be described as an individual's confidence in completing a task or achieving a goal. The Texercise program strives to build self-efficacy in every participant.

 

1.3: What is Evidence-Based

Evidence-based programs are program models or interventions that have been tested, proven effective and translated into practical programs that can provide demonstrated health benefits for participants.

Select meets the Administration for Community Living (ACL) definition for intermediate criteria of an evidence-based program:

 

 

1.4: Program Fidelity

What is Program Fidelity?

Why is it important?

 

 What can you modify/change?

 What can't you modify?

1.5: Facilitator Roles & Responsibilities

Facilitator responsibilities include the following:

Successful Select facilitators:

Remember: Your participants are taking charge of their lifestyles. As a facilitator act as their guide and not a lecturer.

 

1.6: Key Considerations

The role of a facilitator is very important in the delivery of the Select program. Some key characteristics of a good facilitator includes:

Maintain Neutrality. Put aside personal opinions and priorities. Your role is to assist others as they learn.

Be Positive! Go into each session with energy and genuine enthusiasm.

Use Humor. Learning new things is exciting, but can be serious and at times frustrating. Remember to laugh!

Provide Encouragement. Ensure that the participants feel welcome and are encouraged to participate.

Remember Objectives. Keep the objectives of each session in mind.

Provide Opportunities for All. Try not to let one or two people dominate discussions, provide an opportunity for everyone to participate.

Summarize. After a group discussion has finished, summarize the discussion before moving on to the next topic.

Review & Follow Each Session. It is your responsibility to review each session in the Select Facilitator Manual beforehand and follow it as outlined.

1.6: Key Considerations

Listen. Always listen carefully to what participants have to say.

Guide. Guide and encourage the groups' participation.

Communicate. Ensure that the information presented is clear and that people are ready to move forward. Do not wait for someone to ask a question, observe body language and facial expressions.

Facilitate a Learning Environment. Create a comfortable and safe environment for participants.

Anticipate Variety. Be prepared to handle people with different opinions and situations. Make sure that the tone is always respectful. While participants may disagree, everyone should feel safe and welcome to participate.

Be Aware and Flexible. Be aware of the different backgrounds of your participants and make any necessary modifications to reach the specific needs of your class group.

Be Organized. Arrive early and be prepared.

Answer Questions. If you do not know the answer to a participant's question, acknowledge that you will follow up after the session.

1.7: Site Considerations

Texercise Select can be held in a variety of settings. When choosing a site keep in mind these tips to ensure a welcoming environment for all participants.

1.8: Module 1 Summary

• Evidence-based programs are models or interventions that have been tested, proven effective and translated into practical programs that can provide proven health benefits for participants.

• Select is a 10-week structured, evidence-based program that requires trained facilitators.

• Select strives to build the self-efficacy of every participant. Self-efficacy is an individual's confidence in completing a task or achieving a goal.

• Implementing the Select program with fidelity means adhering to the core components of the program.

Module 2

TEXERCISE SELECT RESOURCES

In this module, we will cover the following topics:

Select "next" when you are ready to begin.

2.1: Select Facilitator Manual Components

Key - A key is provided at the beginning of the Select Facilitator Manual explaining the icons used.

2.1: Select Facilitator Manual Components

Timeframe - Each session is 90 minutes long with 45-60 minutes spent on interactive education and the remainder of the time (30-45 minutes) on exercise.

The session agenda and activities in the Select Facilitator Manual follow this timeframe.

2.1: Select Facilitator Manual Components

Sessions - The Select Facilitator Manual is broken into weekly sessions.

Every week there are two class sessions. The first session focuses on physical activity and the second focuses on nutrition.

The session title pages contain the following items:

2.1: Select Facilitator Manual Components

Time to Texercise: Each session you will lead the class in 30-45 minutes* of exercise.

In this example, the agenda indicates there will be 30 minutes of exercise.

You will develop the 30-45 minutes of exercises with the help of the Texercise Plan.

* In Sessions 1-6 participants are asked to perform 30 minutes of exercise. Beginning in Session 6, you are encouraged to increase the length of the exercise portion to reach the goal of 45 minutes.  You will see in Session 6 the agenda indicates 45 minutes of exercise.

2.1: Select Facilitator Manual Components

The Texercise Plan is an example of exercises you can use to develop the exercise portion of your sessions. The plan includes samples for both 30 and 45 minutes of exercise.

The exercises in the Texercise Plan are only suggestions. You are welcome to create your own plan using the exercises from the Texercise handbook. Be sure you choose specific exercises for strength, balance and flexibility.

2.1: Select Facilitator Manual Components

Bullet Points - summarize each activity's main objectives and are provided throughout the Select Facilitator Manual.

Timeframes – are necessary to deliver each activity and are provided at the beginning of each activity.

 

Scripts - are provided throughout the Select Facilitator Manual as an example to help you explain the different sections and activities.  Please prepare beforehand and summarize the script in your own words. You may find that using just the bullets or just the script, or a combination of the two works best for you. (Choose what works for you, your style, and your participants.) The important thing is that the information provided in the Select Facilitator Manual is conveyed to the class participants

 

2.2: Materials

Always review the materials checklist that is provided at the beginning of each session title page to ensure you have the necessary materials.

A list of both necessary and optional materials is provided in the Select Facilitator Manual appendix.

Necessary Training Materials

The basic materials necessary to lead and conduct session activities are displayed in the table below.

 

Required Resource

Number Needed

Facilitator Manual

1 per Facilitator

Handouts

1 per Participant

Writing Materials

1 Flip Chart or Whiteboard

2 Writing Utensils (minimum)

 

2.2: Materials

Additional Optional Materials

Additional materials that you may choose to include are displayed in the table below.

 

Optional Resource

Number Needed

Additional discussion topic sheets

1 per participant

Visuals

One large, or copies for participants

Folders or binders

1 per participant

 

Name tags

1 per participant

 

Flip chart

1 (2 if possible)

Pens or pencils

1 per participant

 

Post-it notes

2 sets

Note pads and pens

1 per participant

 

TV/DVD player or laptop, projector and speakers (if showing DVD)

1 set

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.2: Materials

Fact Sheets. Facilitators are provided with fact sheets that cover a variety of health topics that are used throughout the 10-week course. The fact sheets are intended to provide additional information when presenting these topics.

Visuals/Charts. Facilitators are provided various charts and visuals to use throughout the program. Copies can be made and distributed to participants. These visuals, along with any of the charts or fact sheets, may also be made into posters to use for reference during class. Do what works for your participants with the resources you have available. As with the fact sheets, encourage your participants to visit reputable health related websites, like the U.S. Department of Agriculture, to take charge of their own learning about nutritional eating.

Always refer to the materials checklist in the Select Facilitator Manual prior to each session.

2.3: Appendix Materials

The appendix of the Select Facilitator Manual contains various resources that will assist you in leading each session. The materials included in the appendix provide vital information for you from planning the Texercises to exercise safety tips.

Review the materials located in the appendix and make copies of items you think would be beneficial for participants to have.

The resources in the Appendix include:

 

2.4: Module 2 Summary

Module 3

Facilitator and Participant Skills

In this module, we will cover the following topics:

 

 

 

Select "next" when you are ready to begin.

3.1: Mini Session Demonstration

Please turn your computer speakers on or use headphones, select the link to view the following video, and then continue with the training.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyXUWiewvWg

3.2: Take Charge Challenge

 

3.3: Action Planning

Action Planning is the perfect compliment to goal setting. It provides participants with a way to break their goals down into smaller plans of action that can be achieved on a weekly basis. The more participants feel achievement in smaller steps, the more their self-efficacy builds towards achieving the larger goals.

The action plan is broken up into two steps:

1. the "what" or the activity being done; and

2. the "how often," or frequency.

Using the Texercise Take Charge Challenge sheet, participants will write down their "what" and "how often" action plan for each week of the session. Participants should complete a weekly action plan for both physical activity and nutrition.

Participants action plans are reviewed at the beginning of each week and updated at the end of each session.

Sometimes a little help identifying action items can be extremely useful. A great way for participants to develop their action plan is to partner up with someone else in the class and share ideas.

"Partnering Up" can be used in other aspects of Select as well, like when you would like the class to come up with ideas and suggestions.

3.3: Action Planning

Action planning is beneficial in achieving a goal because it:

3.3: Action Planning

Please turn your computer speakers on or use headphones, select the link to view the following video, and then continue with the training.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyXUWiewvWg

3.4: Brainstorming

Brainstorming engages participants in collecting thoughts and ideas around questions asked during each session. Brainstorming provides participants with the opportunity to share ideas and learn from one other. Use brainstorming to open discussions about health topics outlined in Select and to engage participants in sharing their ideas and knowledge.

There are many brainstorming opportunities throughout the program.

 

3.4: Brainstorming

When brainstorming it is important to:

3.4: Brainstorming

Please turn your computer speakers on or use headphones, select the link to view the following video, and then continue with the training.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gHB-1DCzU_I

3.5: Problem Solving

Problem Solving is an essential skill for participants to have. It is also a great compliment to action planning and brainstorming.

Not as simple as just finding an answer, the skill of problem solving involves:

1. Clearly defining the problem

2. Identifying possible solutions

3. Selecting the best solution

4. Implementing the solution

Problem solving and brainstorming can be used anytime when faced with a challenge. This is a great method to use when assisting participants in finding solutions.

 If participants feel they have a tool to call upon in a time of difficulty, their self-efficacy increases.

 

3.5: Problem Solving

Below outlines how a facilitator should lead participants through a problem solving activity:

1. Clearly define the problem – Ask participants if any would like to problem solve a barrier they faced. Have the participant identify their barrier. The problem should be written at the top of a flip chart, dry erase board or other writing material.

2. Identify possible solutions – Involve all participants to provide potential solutions to the identified barrier. All ideas should be written down.

3. Select the best solution – Ask the participant that volunteered to problem solve their barrier to pick the solutions that they feel they can implement.

4. Implement the solution – Encourage the participant that problem solved their barrier to use the solutions they selected as their action plan for that week.

 

3.5: Problem Solving

Please turn your computer speakers on or use headphones, select the link to view the following video, and then continue with the training.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pSjlkh042Y

3.6: Tracking Logs

Daily Physical Activity Log

Starting in the first session participants are asked to record their physical activity everyday for a month.

Benefits of tracking physical activity:

• Raises awareness of regularly performed activities

• Provides accurate calculation of daily activity (no guessing)

• Reveals patterns

• Keeps focus on goals

Participants should record the date, the activity being performed (walking, gardening, aerobics, strength training), and how long they performed each activity and any notes they may have (drink more water, focused on lower body, caused soreness).

 

 

3.6: Tracking Logs

Daily Food Logs

Starting in the second session participants are asked to track what they eat on a weekly basis for one month.

Benefits of tracking food intake:

• Helps identify healthy and unhealthy eating patterns

• Creates greater awareness and focus on nutrition goals

• Identifies changes based on dietary tracking

Participants track the time, what and how much they eat. Instead of tracking daily, participants are asked to track two weekdays and one weekend day for the month. Days can be consecutive (example, Thursday, Friday, and Saturday) but do not have to be.

 

3.7: Activity

To complete this activity, please review the notes provided in the Texercise Take Charge Challenge sheet below, then scroll down to answer the question below.

 Module 3 Activity

3.8: Module 3 Summary

• The Texercise Take Charge Challenge sheet is a resource that participants use to set their fitness and nutrition goals during Select.

• Action Planning is an activity where participants breakdown their Select goals into weekly action steps.

• Brainstorming is an activity that allows participants to provide responses to various health questions asked by facilitators.

• Problem Solving is an activity that assists participants in identifying solutions to potential barriers to healthy behaviors.

• Select participants are asked to record their physical activity every day for a month using Texercise Daily Physical Activity Log.

• Tracking physical activity provides participants with many benefits including: raising their awareness of the activities they perform, having an accurate calculation of daily activity, highlighting physical activity (or inactivity) patterns, and keeping them focused on their goals.

• Select participants are asked to track what they eat on a weekly basis by tracking two weekdays and one weekend day using the Texercise Daily Food Log.

• Tracking food intake provides participants with benefits including: helping them identify healthy and unhealthy eating patterns, creating greater awareness and focus on nutrition goals, and identifying changes based on dietary tracking.

  

Module 4

Texercises

In this module, we will cover the following topics:

 

Select "next" when you are ready to begin.

4.1: Injury Prevention Tips

A key facilitator responsibility is the safety of the participants. Be sure to teach and instill injury prevention methods with your class. The time it takes will pay in less stress for you, and provides your participants with the benefits of continued, injury-free physical activity.

 The Select Facilitator Manual includes the following tools to help you discuss injury prevention with your class and tips on avoiding injuries:

• The importance of warm ups and cool downs

• How stretching helps reduce injuries

• Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) chart

• Safety Tip fact sheet from E.A.S.Y

• Exercise Precaution chart

Some of these will be highlighted in the next few slides.

 

4.1: Injury Prevention Tips

Warm-Up, Cool-Down and Stretching

When it comes to exercising warm-up, cool-down, and stretching are often ignored, but they are essential to avoid injury.

4.1: Injury Prevention Tips

Safety Tips

The Select Facilitator Manual provides an EASY fact sheet that covers the following injury prevention topics:

• Exercise Safety Tips to Always Consider Prior to Starting Exercise

• Exercise Safety Tips for When to STOP Exercising

• Exercise Safety Tips to Recognize Days/Times When Exercise Should NOT be Initiated

 

Some of the recommendations on this comprehensive fact sheet include:

• the importance of clothing choices for exercising;

• hydration;

• outdoor safety; and

• physical symptoms that determine when a person should or should not exercise.

 

4.1: Injury Prevention Tips

Exercise Precaution Chart

The Select Facilitator Manual includes a chart that provides guidelines for when participants should stop exercising. These guidelines include:

• Have pain or pressure in chest, neck, shoulder or arm

• Feel dizzy or sick

• Break out in a cold sweat

• Have muscle cramps

• Feel acute (not just achy) pain in your joints, feet, ankles or legs

 

Participants should be able to talk while exercising without gasping for breath. If they have trouble breathing, have them slow down.

 

*If possible, facilitators should have this chart posted in each session.

 

4.2: Understanding Fitness Levels

To measure progress, a person needs to have a starting point of their current physical health. This provides them with the knowledge of how much exercise they should perform and when they should progress to the next fitness level.

 

It also serves as a motivator when participants can see the progress they have made.

 

As a facilitator, you will need to understand and explain the three fitness levels from the Texercise handbook to help participants identify their current fitness levels.

Level 1 (Beginner): Has not exercised in the past month

Level 2 (Beginner/Intermediate): Exercises 1-2 times a week

Level 3 (Intermediate/Advanced): Exercises three or more times a week

 

4.3: The Four Types of Exercises

Select teaches four types of exercises. As a class facilitator, you will be responsible for understanding each exercise so that you are capable of demonstrating and leading a sequence of exercises each class session.

 

The four types of exercises covered by Select include:

• Endurance

• Strength

• Balance

• Flexibility

 

4.3: The Four Types of Exercises

Endurance

Endurance activities increase participants' breathing and heart rate and improve stamina for daily tasks such as climbing stairs and shopping. It is recommended that this type of exercise be performed at least five times a week for 30 minutes.

 

4.3: The Four Types of Exercises

Strength

Strength exercises challenge participants muscles to build their stamina. Having strong muscles allows everyday activities to become easier, as well as reducing the risk of injury during those activities.

 

4.3: The Four Types of Exercises

Balance

Balance helps prevent falls. Balance is a key component of fitness and is essential to any physical activity participants do, including sports or aerobic activities. Balance exercises strengthen leg muscles to help keep participants on their feet.

 

4.3: The Four Types of Exercises

Flexibility

It is important that participants stretch after completing strength and endurance exercises. Encourage participants to stretch slowly and push themselves to stretch a bit farther each time, although never to the point of pain.

 

4.4: Texercise Plan

 

4.4: Texercise Plan

During sessions 1 through 5 you should follow the Texercise Plan designed for 30 minutes of exercise. You can follow the Texercise Plan or develop one of your own. If you choose to make your own, it should follow this basic routine.

 

4.4: Texercise Plan

Starting in session 6 you are encouraged to increase the exercise portion to up to 45 minutes. You can follow the Texercise Plan or develop one of your own. If you choose to make your own it should follow this basic routine when increasing time to up to 45 minutes.

 

4.5: Activity

To complete this activity, please review the notes provided in the Texercise Plan below, then scroll down to answer the question below.

 Module 4 Activity

4.6: Exercise Tips

While facilitating the exercise portion of Select keep in mind:

Encourage participants both when beginning exercises and during each subsequent class. An exercise routine can be difficult to learn, start, and, even more importantly, maintain.

Proper form when completing an exercise allows participants to gain the most benefit possible and helps to reduce the risk of injury. Be sure to model the proper form of exercises.

Breathe while exercising. It is easy to find yourself holding your breath when concentrating on getting the exercises right. Remind participants to take deep belly breathes in and long breaths out when exercising.

Modify the exercises when needed by participants. Individuals have different levels of functional ability and may need to engage in modified exercises. If you are able to have two facilitators during a class, it is recommended that one facilitator demonstrate a modified version of each exercise. If you are a single facilitator, demonstrate modifications when needed.

 

4.6: Exercise Tips

Encourage participants to engage in physical activity outside of class. Provide ideas such as:

• watching the Texercise DVD

• walking with friends or family

• creating a workout group with others in the class

 

Weights are not required during Select. Participants do not need fancy gear! For participants who would like to use weights, encourage them to make their own using the directions outlined in the Texercise handbook.

 

4.7: Texercise Demonstration

Please turn your computer speakers on or use headphones, select the link to view the following video, and then continue with the training.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=untmBsoUa80

4.8: Module 4 Summary

• Warm-ups and cool-downs are injury prevention techniques that prepare the body for exercise and gradually returns heart rate and breathing to normal levels respectively.

• Select breaks fitness levels into three categories: level 1 – beginner, level 2 – beginner/intermediate, and level 3 – intermediate/advanced.

• Select covers four types of exercises: endurance, strength, balance and flexibility.

• Facilitators are encouraged to increase the exercise portion of Select to 45 minutes starting in session 6.

Module 5

Nutrition

In this module, we will cover the following topics:

 

Select "next" when you are ready to begin.

 

5.1: Importance of Nutrition

A key facilitator responsibility is understanding and communicating the importance of good nutrition to participants. Good nutrition plays a critical role in having a healthy lifestyle. Combined with regular physical activity, a good diet can help participants reach and maintain a healthy weight, reduce the risk of chronic diseases (like heart disease and cancer), and promote overall health.

 

Texercise provides facilitators with the following tools to help lead discussions on proper nutrition:

• Choose MyPlate resources

• Texercise nutrition fact sheets

  

5.2: Nutrition Resources

Texercise nutrition fact sheets are used starting in the second weekly session as discussion topics. The participants learn a variety of information regarding proper nutrition.

 

5.2: Nutrition Resources

The Understanding Nutrition fact sheet covers:

• metabolism,

• counting calories,

• and key supplements for older adults.

 

Participants should always consult with their doctor before adding dietary supplements to their daily routine as some supplements may interact with medications.

 

5.2: Nutrition Resources

 

 

5.2: Nutrition Resources

 

 

 

5.2: Nutrition Resources

There are many resources that can be used as a compliment to the nutrition resources provide throughout Texercise Select. Use the following websites as references to learn more about nutrition and provide participants with additional resources.

 

5.3: Activity

To complete this activity, please review the notes provided in the Texercise Daily Food Log below, then scroll down to answer the question below.

 Module 5 Activity

5.4: Module 5 Summary

• Good nutrition combined with regular physical activity can help Select participants maintain healthy weight, reduce risk of chronic diseases, and promote overall health.

• Select provides nutrition facts on a variety of topics from Understanding Nutrition to Decoding the Food Label that facilitators will use to educate participants on proper nutrition.

• Choose MyPlate is a resource from the U.S. Department of Agriculture that can be used in conjunction with the Texercise Portion Guide when discussing portion control with participants.

Module 6

Recognition

In this module, we will cover the following topics:

Select "next" when you are ready to begin.

6.1: Importance of Recognition

Throughout the program participants work hard to meet their fitness and nutrition goals. Every week participants are committing their time to learning about healthy lifestyle behaviors, engaging in physical activity and brainstorming ways to overcome obstacles. It is important to recognize their efforts and the accomplishments they have reached.

 

Celebrating participant achievements not only provides them with a sense of pride and accomplishment it also encourages them to continue to engage in regular physical activity and healthy eating.

 

6.2: Participant Recognition

Recognize the group's hard-work and efforts by holding a celebration event. This can be as simple or elaborate as you want, but should provide an environment that celebrates everyone's accomplishments.

Texercise T-shirts and certificates are provided to help recognize participants.

 

6.3: Module 6 Summary

• It is important to celebrate participant's achievements because it not only provides them with a sense of pride and accomplishment it also encourages them to continue engaging in healthy lifestyle behaviors.

• Having a celebration event for Select participants is a great way to recognize participants hard-work and can be as simple or elaborate as you want.

 Texercise provides Select facilitators with t-shirts and certificates to recognize their participants.

Final Test

 

Congratulations! You have completed the Select Facilitator presentation.

 Texercise Select Final Test